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Is Your Diet Hurting Your Teeth?

November 3, 2015

Filed under: Dental Health,Diet for Health — Tags: — Dr Gillis @ 4:45 pm
IMG_0466Our office just wanted you to see this information so that you can stay informed!

Most people know that acidic foods and sweet foods are bad for teeth – especially if you combine the two (think soda or energy drinks).  What many may not be aware of is that food and diets considered ‘healthy’ may also cause harm.  This information from an article put out by the ADA (American Dental Association) in their publication ADA Morning Huddle 11/3/15. (more…)

Dr. Gillis Describes What Our Gums Would Like to Say to Us!

July 9, 2015

What Our Gums Would Like to Say to Us!

If only they could!

Hello!  This is your gums with a message for you.

Hello! This is your gums with a message for you.

 

Gums don’t complain much, even when we are infected!  Can you see the soft looking white stuff between the lower teeth.  That is a lot of bacteria and debris here.  Bacteria like to live between your teeth and under your gums.”

This continues to be your gums talking to YOU!  “Could you give me about five minutes of your time?  You shouldn’t neglect me even though I don’t protest.  When I bleed I don’t really hurt you, but it is not normal for me, your gums, to bleed!  I am really like skin but inside your mouth.  Do you want your skin to bleed?  Brushing and flossing help remove the debris that is accumulating all the time.  The bone below me, your gums, doesn’t talk much either.  But those darn bacteria ‘peeing’ below your gums actually cause bone destruction and open up even more places for bacteria to hide below your gums continuing the process.”

See tartar between teeth.  Periodontal disease and gum disease.

See tartar between teeth. Periodontal disease and gum disease.

“Back to the 5 minutes per day that I, your gums, am asking for:  What I would like is for you to show focused attention to brushing all areas of the teeth, mouth and gums at least twice per day and flossing or using an inter dental device (water pic, sulca brush, hydro floss or comparable) at least once per day!”

Periodontal disease and gum disease following treatment - bone loss remains but gums have healed.

Periodontal disease and gum disease following treatment – bone loss remains but gums have healed.

“This bone doesn’t complain much either, but once it is gone – it is probably gone for good. I, your gums, can actually heal given the right treatment.”

If you don’t know exactly what to do or how to take care of me, your gums, then please ask your dentist (our office!) or your dental hygienist who you should be seeing both regularly!  Our office would be happy to help you  become aware of the condition of your mouth -all the good, all the bad – and offer options to get you as healthy as possible.  Your gums and you will be happy you have taken the responsibility for this!

“Yours for better dental health,

Sincerely, your gums”

Because We Care About Your Oral Health!

June 18, 2015

Because We Care About Your Oral Health!

This letter is for you, my patients,

Do you have gum disease, gingivitis, or periodontal disease?  Do you know if there is any infection present in your mouth? Do you have oral cancer? Ninety percent (90%!) of people have some type of disease or infection in their mouths!  My guess is that far less than 90% are aware of this.  Once you take ownership of the condition of your mouth, you can make decisions that are appropriate for you to address these concerns. If you don’t know the answer to these questions, ask us! We are happy to provide you with the tools and information you need to achieve the level of health you would like.

Periodontal disease prior to treatment

Periodontal disease and gingivitis  prior to treatment

Periodontal disease after treatment

Periodontal disease and gingivitis after treatment

Only you can make the changes necessary to get your mouth healthy, so it is very important for you to OWN these diseases if present and own the responsibility for their treatment.  One of the most important things I can do for my patients is to let you know exactly what is going on in your mouth – good and bad – and offer you options to address any areas of concern.

Yours for better dental health,

Julie M Gillis DDS PC

“Caring For and Enhancing Your Smile”

(970) 242-3635 office

www.juliegillisdds.com

We would love to have you follow us on Facebook!  https://www.facebook.com/juliegillisddspc

 

Go Ahead – Have That Small Glass of Wine!

February 24, 2015

Filed under: Dental Health,Uncategorized — Tags: — Dr Gillis @ 5:04 pm

Go Ahead – Have That Small Glass of Wine!

wine resized-100

This information from Dentistry Today, July 2014, page 42

Red wine just may have another health benefit!  For anyone looking for another reason to enjoy a glass of red wine with dinner, this might be interesting.  A new study has found that red wine as well as grape seed extract could potentially help prevents cavities.  Ingredients in red wine may also lead to the development of natural products that ward off dental diseases with fewer side effects!

Quoted from Dentistry Today’s article, “Past research has suggested that polyphenols, grape seed extract, and wine can slow bacterial growth, so M. Victoria Noreno-Arribas, author of the book Wine Chemistry and Biochemistry, and her colleagues decided to test them under realistic conditions for the first time.  They grew cultures of bacteria responsible for dental diseases as a biofilm for several minutes in different liquids, including:

  • red wine
  • red wine without the alcohol,
  • red wine spiked with grape seed extract, and
  • water with 12% ethanol.

Their discovery:  red wine with or without alcohol and wine with grape seed extract were the most effective at getting rid of the bacteria.”

wine resized-122 wine resized-121

Our office is not promoting drinking wine – just sharing information.  It is always smart to drink responsibly and in moderation.  Our office is located in Grand Junction, Colorado.  We try to post blogs about once a week that we hope are of interest to our patients.  We welcome new patients and try to take care of our patients as we would like to be taken care of – with talent, precision, laughter, and respect.  We welcome your comments and we would love to have you follow us on Facebook.  See Dr. Julie Gillis, DDS PC

 

 

Yours for better dental health,

 Julie Gillis, DDS

“Caring For and Enhancing Your Smile”

 

 

Yikes! What is That Lump In My Mouth?

March 12, 2014

Filed under: Customer Service,Oral Cancer screening,Tori or Dental Tori — Tags: , — Dr Gillis @ 12:16 am
Tori midline of palate.

Tori midline of palate.

That hard lump could be a harmless bone growth called a tori!

Tori are also known as Torus or exostoses.

It is always a good idea to examine your mouth thoroughly looking for anything unusual:

  • Check for growths – are they hard, soft? Note the size.
  • Check for sores – especially sores that do not heal within two weeks.
  • Check for any inflammation usually noted as redness
  • Check for discolored areas – note color, size, and are they changing?
  • Check for areas that look irritated, and
  • Check for any areas that look ‘different’!

If you notice a hard swelling and you are not sure how long it has been present it may be a tori. Hard lumps along your upper or lower  jaw on the  gums by your teeth or on the top of your mouth may be a ‘normal’ bone growth called a Tori or dental tori.  If a tori occurs on the palate of the upper jaw, it is known as a torus palatinus and they are usually near the midline of the palate.  Tori can also occur on the cheek side (buccal side) of upper and lower teeth as well and they are usually seen by the molars and premolars. In these areas tori are almost always present on both sides (bilaterally).  Tori are slightly more common in males.

Note tori on the cheek side of the teeth as well as on the tongue side.

Note tori on the cheek side of the teeth as well as on the tongue side.

This unusual tori is just present on one side of the mouth and the patient believes she had a gum graft in this area.

This unusual tori is just present on one side of the mouth and the patient believes she had a gum graft in this area.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Usually, tori will occur  in approximately the same areas on both sides of the mouth. Or the tori will occur at the midline of the palate as shown above.  Occasionally tori will be much more prominent on one side of the mouth.  These should always be evaluated by your dentist or by an oral surgeon.

This tori present on just one side of the mouth is much more unusual!

This tori present on just one side of the mouth is much more unusual!

Our office would be happy to answer your questions about dental tori or other conditions in your mouth! We are located in Grand Junction, Colorado.  We would love to have you LIKE us on Facebook! (see https://www.facebook.com/juliegillisddspc?ref=br_tf)

Our office website is www.juliegillisds.com.  For further information, please contact us at (970) 242-3635.

If teeth are lost it may be difficult to place a partial over tori. Best to keep your teeth healthy!

If teeth are lost it may be difficult to place a partial denture over a tori. Best plan is to keep your teeth healthy!

Yours for better health,

Julie Gillis, DDS

“Restoring Smiles – Restoring Health”

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1190 Bookcliff Ave. Suite 201, Grand Junction, CO 81501 USA
Julie M Gillis DDS Grand Junction, CO cosmetic, general, & restorative dentist. (970) 242-3635 (970) 242-8479 jgillis@juliegillisdds.com