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Cheese – A Delicious, Nutritious, Vitamin-Packed Cavity Fighter!

September 19, 2013

Filed under: Cavities and Dental Decay,Diet for Health,Tooth Decay — Dr Gillis @ 3:52 am

Yes, it’s true!

Research suggests that eating cheese may help prevent the development of cavities.  In a recent study published in General Dentistry, the Journal of the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD) found that consuming (eating!) cheese changes the pH in our mouths.  The pH is raised or becomes less acidic after eating cheese or at least the cheddar cheese tested.  And, this may help reduce the risk of tooth minerals being lost – the start of cavities – due to the acids produced by the bacteria in everyone’s mouths.  Tooth erosion from bacterial acids (crudely put as bacterial ‘pee’) causes tooth erosion and cavities or holes in the teeth.  The researchers randomly divided 68 subjects aged 12 to 15 into three groups and monitored dental plaque pH (dental plaque is basically bacteria and proteins and goo from our bodies and our diet) before and after the consumption of different groups

  • One group ate sugar-free yogurt
  • One group drank milk
  • One group ate cheddar cheese

The levels of pH were measured at 10, 20, and 30 minutes after eating or drinking.  A change in pH was only observed in the individuals who consumed cheese, whose oral pH rose at each time interval.  The act of chewing stimulates saliva production and is at least partly responsible for the rise in pH.  Compounds in the cheese may stick to the teeth which MAY provide additional cavity protection.

Cheese is good for you too – nutrient and mineral packed.  There are also a lot of calories so it is smart to consume responsibly.  We recommend regular brushing and flossing as well.  Cover your bases!

Coming soon – Is Chocolate Good For Your Teeth?

Our office believes in healthy teeth, healthy mouths, and your overall health.  A well balanced diet is part of this.  Brushing and flossing are like exercise for your teeth and we all know regular exercise is good for us.  Our office is located in Grand Junction, Colorado.  Please visit our web site at www.juliegillisdds.com for information about us!  We hope you will find us on Facebook and like us!  See Julie M Gillis DDS PC!  Our phone number is (970) 242-3635.

Yours for better dental health,

Julie Gillis DDS

“Caring For and Enhancing Your Smile”

 

Free e-Booklet: Recipes To Keep Teeth Brighter and Stronger!

June 24, 2013

Filed under: Customer Service,Diet for Health,Uncategorized — Tags: — Dr Gillis @ 11:03 pm

Free e-Booklet: Recipes for a Healthier Smile

Keep Teeth Brighter, Stronger
Recent studies (referenced hereand here) have shown that what you eat can have both a positive and negative impact on your oral health. The American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD) wants to help uncover the smile secrets in your kitchen with a Recipes for a Healthier Smile e-booklet featuring delicious new recipes using key ingredients to help keep your smile at its best.

This free e-booklet features breakfast, lunch, snack, dinner, and dessert recipes using fruits, vegetables, grains, and other ingredients experts have identified as “super-smile” foods. There are also tips on foods that can play havoc with your smile such as soda, dark berries and dried fruits, as well as a list of healthful smile ingredients and their specific benefits.

For instance, did you know that pineapple can act as a “whitener” for teeth. Click here for an online exclusive recipe for Carrot-Pineapple Ginger Salad.

Our office is located in Grand Junction, Colorado.  Please call us at (970) 242-3635 or email us at jgillis@juliegillisdds.com.  Please visit our office website www.juliegillisdds.com.  We would love to hear from you!

Mouth Rinses, are they useful? What kind to use?

December 28, 2011

Submitted by my hygienist Diane

 hygienist with the office of Dr. Julie Gillis

Mouth Rinse Options (Kidding about the soap!)

Patients often ask us which mouth rinse is the “best.” Though we generally do not advocate any one in particular, we have found the use of a daily rinse containing fluoride is beneficial to patients prone to decay. Fluoride has been shown to strengthen the enamel of teeth and minimize the harmful effects of bacteria and their byproducts.

There are a number of reasons that may increase decay susceptibility; including high sugar diets, poor homecare, or dry mouth syndrome. As patients age, they often notice they have decreased salivary flow, which oftentimes is a side effect of many medications. Saliva naturally dilutes the acid produced by the bacteria that collects around our teeth daily. So decay tendency can be reduced by using either a prescription strength fluoride paste or fluoride mouth rinse available in our office, or by using an OTC fluoride rinse such as ACT (or its generic equivalent). Other mouth rinses such as Listerine,  or Scope are also fine, but due to the high alcohol content, they tend to further dry out the mouth. These should be avoided by patients prone to decay.

The use of alcohol-free anti-bacterial mouth rinses such as Breath Rx or CloSys (both available in our office) may be very beneficial.  Both work to stop bad breath by neutralizing foul-smelling odors, killing the bacteria that cause bad breath, and preventing plaque build-up that leads to gingivitis.

And who doesn’t want a healthier, fresher smelling mouth?

 

This information shared with you by Julie Gillis, DDS PC.  Our office is located  in Grand Junction, Colorado.  We feel that your dental health is the top priority. and if we can make your smile more attractive while improving your health that is wonderful! Dr. Gillis practices restorative and cosmetic dentistry including porcelain veneers, tooth whitening, implants, crowns, bridges and periodontal care.  Our office website is www.juliegillisds.com.  For further information, please contact us at (970) 242-3635.

Yours for better health,

 Julie Gillis, DDS, “Restoring Smiles, Restoring Health”

Why is Dr. Gillis’ office giving patients xylitol gum?

October 25, 2011

Xylodent candy and gum

 Can a sweetener be good for you?  Can candy and gum prevent decay?

Xylitol may just be the sweet and delicious product that we have been looking for that prevents decay, adds fewer calories to our diets, and may improve our overall health.  Produced naturally, xylitol is a five-carbon sugar alcohol derived primarily from birch and other hardwood trees.  It is also found in some plums, strawberries, raspberries and even fungi.  Xylitol is also produced in the human liver explaining why it is safe for humans to consume.

In crystalline form like SimplyXylitol™ sprinkling sugar, xylitol can be used on cereals, fruit or anything you may sprinkle sugar on.  It contains approximately 40 percent of the calories in table sugar.  Xylitol is not safe for your pets though so DO NOT give it to your dog or cat!  Xylitol is a natural sweetener that enhances the flavor of food, especially fruit, and it is safe for patients of all ages. By decreasing our consumption of ‘regular’ sugar we consume less calories, stops the cavity-causing bacteria from growing, and significantly reduce the risk of cavity formation.

Gum and candy sweetened with Xylitol

 

Do not give zylitol to your pets!

 Xylitol is just one of many artificial sweeteners.  Many were discovered accidently in the process of studying something different like Cyclamate (sucaryl) and Aspartame (Equalâ, NutraSweetâ). Other natural sweeteners like honey and Agave nectar do not have the anticaries benefit of xylitol.  There are the “S” sweeteners like Stevia, Saccharin and Sucralose (Splenda) to further complicate our sweetening choices. 

 A safe alternative would be to limit sugar and sugar substitutes in all forms and of course, consume more fruit and vegetables!

Unlike xylitol, eating table sugar creates an acidic, decay promoting pH.  Bacteria do not readily metabolize xylitol, but xylitol will accumulate in the bacterial cells and inhibit their growth reducing the risk of cavity formation.  Xylitol was discovered in the late 1800s. During World War II, sugar shortages created a need for alternative sweeteners and xylitol was manufactured in crystalline form.  Diabetics benefit from xylitol due to its insulin-independent characteristics.  Xylitol chewing gum was produced in Finland in 1974.  Xylitol may be used in beverages, candy, chewing gum, and other non-baked deserts (xylitol does not caramelize when heated so it cannot be used in baking). 

Happy, healthy eating to you,

Dr. Julie Gillis

 

This information shared with you by Julie Gillis, DDS PC.  Our office is located  in Grand Junction, Colorado.  We feel that your dental health is the top priority. and if we can make your smile more attractive while improving your health that is wonderful! Dr. Gillis practices restorative and cosmetic dentistry including porcelain veneers, tooth whitening, implants, crowns, bridges and periodontal care.  Our office website is www.juliegillisds.com.  For further information, please contact us at (970) 242-3635.

Yours for better health,

 Julie Gillis, DDS, “Restoring Smiles, Restoring Health”

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1190 Bookcliff Ave. Suite 201, Grand Junction, CO 81501 USA
Julie M Gillis DDS Grand Junction, CO cosmetic, general, & restorative dentist. (970) 242-3635 (970) 242-8479 jgillis@juliegillisdds.com