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Julie M. Gillis, DDS, PC Blog

Periodontal Disease and Gingivitis

August 15, 2016

Periodontal Disease and Gingivitis

Periodontal Disease and gingivitis are diseases usually do not hurt.  By some estimates, over 90% of the population have some form of active periodontal disease and/or gingivitis.  Simply put, gingivitis is a reversible infection of the gums.  It can be eliminated with a professional cleaning and thorough home care.  However, this infection will easily return without continued personal and professional care.

Periodontal disease involves bone loss around the teeth.  It is an infectious disease – not a natural disease of aging for example – that should be treated for optimal health.  Once you have periodontal disease you will always have the bone loss unless it has been surgically corrected. You can however eliminate active periodontal disease so that the bone loss does not continue.

Advanced periodontal disease and gingivitis or gum disease prior to treatment.

Advanced periodontal disease and gingivitis or gum disease prior to treatment.

Advanced periodontal disease and gum disease or gingivitis after treatment.

Advanced periodontal disease and gum disease or gingivitis after treatment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leaving these diseases untreated is like leaving oozing sores anywhere else on your body!  In our office we are happy to help you successfully treat these infections with gentle, through cleanings and periodontal therapy to help you get as healthy as you would like to be.  Please call our office to schedule an appointment today at (970)242-3635.  Even though these diseases are not glamorous to treat they are probably some of the most useful services we provide!

Yours for better dental health,

Julie Gillis DDS, PC

Restoring Smiles/Restoring Health

 

Is Chewing Ice Really Bad For Teeth?

June 30, 2016

Filed under: Habits and Teeth,Habits and Your Teeth — Tags: , — drgillis @ 4:35 pm

Is Chewing Ice Really Bad For Teeth?

Chewing ice is not good for anyone’s teeth, but it can be especially bad for teeth that are already weakened with fillings.  Think of your teeth as fine pieces of crystal.  When you have a filling done, a hole is cut into the crystal which weakens the overall structure.  Your mouth where these fine crystals live is a very hot, moist environment.  When you chew ice, it is like taking that hot crystal, dipping it in icy liquid, and smacking it with something very hard.

To chew ice or not - our recommendation is don't do it!

Is chewing ice bad?  Our recommendation is don’t do it!

As you are chewing ice your tooth cycles between being very warm to ice cold over and over.  Combine that with the hardness of the ice you are crunching and you have a potential bad situation that often leads to the tooth fracturing.  Large tooth fractures may require a crown to save the tooth.  If the fractures are deep they can even cause damage to the tooth’s nerve which could require a root canal plus a new filling and a crown to save the tooth.  Wouldn’t it just be better to break the ice chewing habit?

Our office cares about you and the health of your teeth.  There are many habits that can be very harmful to your teeth and chewing ice is one of them.  Please call our office located in Grand Junction Colorado for more information on this topic or any other dental concern.  We love to help!

Yours for better dental health, Julie Gillis DDS

Restoring Teeth/Restoring Smiles

 

Tooth Extraction? What Questions to Ask Now?

June 21, 2016

Filed under: Uncategorized — drgillis @ 11:36 pm
Tooth extraction?

This is a very visible tooth extraction site and it must be managed properly to achieve a successful result! Missing central incisor due to extensive decay and fracture.

Tooth Extraction? What Questions to Ask Now?

Have you recently had a tooth extraction? I am happy to help you come up with a couple good questions that you should ask your dentist to be better informed when making treatment decisions.  Teeth and their roots support the tissue so when a tooth is lost it is very important to support the tissue so that it does not collapse.  This is especially important for a front tooth where the tissue is on display when talking and smiling!  Your dentist may plan to do a site preservation graft to help prevent bone collapse following the extraction.  Depending on the situation, the dentist should be making you some type of custom temporary crown or treatment bridge or an interim partial denture (flipper) to maintain the space where the tooth was.

The best questions to ask before and after a tooth extraction are the following:

  1. Do the adjacent teeth need restorations? If the answer to this is yes, then doing a permanent bridge may be the best option.  Depending on the amount of healing that will change the shape of the extraction site, a bridge may be able to be done very soon after the extraction and you could eliminate the additional cost of an interim partial.
  1. Is the bone in the area of the tooth extraction healthy enough for an implant?
  1. Will bone grafting or tissue grafting be necessary for an optimal result with either an implant or a bridge?
  1. What is the prognosis for an implant long term in your mouth in this area given the health of the supporting structures, adjacent teeth and your bite (occlusion) as well as habits?
  1. If an implant is planned, a custom fabricated abutment and treatment will give you the best result for an anterior tooth to support the gum tissue as it heals, while a prefabricated abutment may be fine for a posterior tooth.
  1. If a bridge is planned instead of an implant find out if the teeth adjacent to the extraction site are healthy enough to be a supporting tooth for a bridge and what is the prognosis of doing this?

Ideally, these questions are asked and answered before the tooth extraction so a good plan is in place to have the most successful outcome!  In our office we will spend the time needed to thoroughly review your options so you can made decisions that will be correct for you now and in the future!  Keep in mind that whenever a bridge is done if anything happens to any one of the teeth supporting the bridge, an entire new bridge may be needed to correct the problem.  With an implant and a crown your future problems are one tooth problems.

I hope this information is useful! Yours for better dental health,

Julie Gillis DDS

Restoring Smiles/Restoring Health

Clear Tooth Aligners – a good looking alternative to braces!

June 16, 2016

Filed under: Invisalign-type Appliances — Tags: — drgillis @ 5:41 pm

Clear Tooth Aligners – a better looking alternative to braces!

The Answer Is Clear!

Are you a candidate for Clear Tooth Aligners?  Clear Aligners are sometimes called Invisalign.  These appliances are a way to achieve  an improvement in the alignment of teeth without the need for metal wires and brackets.  So, you can get your smile straight without train-track woes!

Clear Aligners mads a big difference for Chloe!

Clear Tooth Aligners mads a big difference for Chloe!

Clear Aligners mads a big difference for Chloe!

Clear Tooth Aligners mads a big difference for Chloe!

When we see things that are askew, there is often the uncontrollable urge to set it right … like a necktie that hangs to one side or a picture hanging crooked on the wall.  This desire for straightening is even more prominent when it comes to our teeth.  However, many forgo treatment to avoid the discomfort and hassle of traditional braces.  Clear tooth aligners let you move your teeth while you are wearing the appliances but allow the option to remove when you just don’t want to have them on!  Important to note that the clear aligners work best when they are worn a minimum of 20 hours per day.

Clear Aligners mads a big difference for Chloe!

Clear Aligners mads a big difference for Chloe! Although the alignment is not perfect, we were very happy with the result.

Adults account for nearly 25% of all orthodontic patients.  The most common problems are crowded teeth, teeth spaced too far apart, protruding upper or lower teeth, and upper and lower front teeth that do not touch.

Misalignment detracts from the an otherwise healthy smile!

Misalignment detracts from the an otherwise healthy smile!

Now there’s no reason to hide … since we offer ClearCorrect™ or Invisalign™ to correct the misalignment of front teeth. Using a series of smooth, comfortable, and virtually invisible plastic aligners similar to a sports mouth guard or bleaching tray, we gradually and gently shift your teeth into the proper position.  Every few weeks, you will receive a new aligner that continues the gradual process of realigning your teeth.  These custom-made aligners are completely removable, so you can eat, drink, brush, and floss normally … then just pop the trays back into place for the rest of the day.

Chloe came in a few years ago unhappy with the appearance of her misaligned teeth.  Clear aligners satisfied her treatment goals without the hassle of brackets and metal wires!  Call our office today for a consultation to see if clear aligner treatment will work for you! You can also reach us at (970) 242-3635.

Yours for better dental health,

Julie Gillis DDS, PC

Restoring Smiles/Restoring Health

Fluoride Treatments – Are They Beneficial?

June 7, 2016

Filed under: Fluoride — Tags: — drgillis @ 7:14 pm

Fluoride Treatments – Are They Beneficial?

By Karen, treatment assistant for Julie M Gillis, DDS

Fluoride Treatments – should your child have them? As a treatment assistant for Dr. Julie Gillis, I have the pleasure of seeing many young patients. One of the services we provide for our young patients is a fluoride treatment when they come in for their dental cleaning. Along with x-rays, cleaning and an exam with the doctor, a fluoride treatment is a very important part of your child’s visit. The goal of fluoride is to help prevent cavities and it also serves to decrease tooth sensitivity.  Tooth decay is caused by bacteria that produce acids that weaken the enamel.

Fluoride is applied directly to the tooth surfaces with a paintbrush.

A Fluoride Treatment is applied directly to the tooth surfaces with a paintbrush.

Fluoride helps strengthen tooth enamel and helps protect the teeth from damage. In our office we use fluoride varnish. Fluoride varnish is a quick and simple way to help protect teeth. Fluoride varnish is applied directly to clean teeth with a small brush.

Fluoride treatments come in several flavors and consistencies to afford the maximum in tooth protection and comfort for the patient.

Fluoride treatments come in several flavors and consistencies to afford the maximum in tooth protection and comfort for the patient.

One of the benefits of using a fluoride varnish is it leaches fluoride into tooth structure for several weeks after being applied. In between visits, make sure your child is using a fluoride tooth paste.  Our office at 1190 Bookcliff Avenue Suite 201 in Grand Junction, Colorado would love to see you and your children.  We would be happy to answer any questions you may have at 970-242-3635.

Your friend in your oral health care,

Karen

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1190 Bookcliff Ave. Suite 201, Grand Junction, CO 81501 USA
Julie M Gillis DDS Grand Junction, CO cosmetic, general, & restorative dentist. (970) 242-3635 (970) 242-8479 jgillis@juliegillisdds.com